OUA All-Rookie Team Members Call SJU Home

Ontario University Athletics (OUA) announced the 2017 OUA football All-Rookie Team early in November, recognizing four players who call St. Jerome’s University home. Leading the University of Waterloo offence, which was described by the OUA as “one of the most potent in the conference”, is Norm Marshall OUA rookie of the year award winning quarterback Tre Ford. Brother and cornerback Tyrell Ford was also named to the All-Rookie squad with fellow Waterloo Warriors offensive tackle Spencer Andrews and defensive tackle Michael Perak. The OUA described the Warriors’ “young talent” as an indicator that “the future is once again bright for Warriors football.”

 

“We are delighted that these fine young athletes have chosen to make St. Jerome’s University their home away from home,” noted Dr. Scott Kline, Vice President Academic and Dean at St. Jerome’s University, federated with the University of Waterloo. “Our residence has been selected as the preferred choice by 33 varsity athletes this year, with many co-registered in the Faculty of Arts through St. Jerome’s University. Our community provides a supportive and caring environment that is ideal for balancing the challenging training and academic schedules of these student athletes.”

 

Warriors Coach Marshal Bingeman extended his congratulations to St. Jerome’s University on having four residents of the OUA All Rookie football team, including the OUA Rookie of the Year Tre Ford, as residents. “The welcoming nature and outstanding facilities of your community are a big part of Tre, Tyrell, Spencer, and Mike choosing to play for the Waterloo Warriors,” stated Bingeman.

 

Perak says that living and studying at St. Jerome’s University definitely has its advantages. “All of my classes are within a 30 second walk,” he noted, adding that the unlimited and quality of the food plan at the University provides athletes with the energy they need to get through their workouts. All of the rookies identified that the amenities on site at the residence are appealing, with the gym being a great asset. “St. Jerome’s University is close to everything,” added Tre.

 

Together is a daily part of the residence experience for these rookies, who do not have far to go to connect with their teammates. Spending time together with other football players and athletes has created what Tyrell describes as “one big SJU community.” Andrews adds that when they are not together, the study rooms in residence “allow you to get the quiet you need.”

Director, Alumni Development, Sue Brubacher, sees the athletes as another example of the kind of students who become great ambassadors once they graduate: “St. Jerome’s University attracts leaders,” she says. “Our athletes are a great example of high school student leaders who are further developing their leadership skills at university – both on the field, in the classroom, and in residence. We are proud to have them call our campus home.”

 

St. Jerome’s University congratulates the success of these athletes who already have made significant contributions to Warriors football in their rookie year. With bright futures ahead, the community is proud to know that these talented students have chosen to call St. Jerome’s University home.

The New Quarterly Wins Double Gold

Canadian literary magazine and St. Jerome’s University partner The New Quarterly (TNQ) won two gold medals at the recent 40th Annual National Magazine Awards. Winners were selected from 197 magazines from across Canada by The National Magazine Foundation, a bilingual, not-for-profit institution that recognizes excellence in the content and creation of Canadian print and digital publications through an annual awards program. TNQ's wins for both fiction and poetry were the best showing by any literary magazine in Canada and the second time the magazine has swept both awards. Dr. Scott Kline, Vice President Academic and Dean recognized TNQ’s double gold at the recent St. Jerome’s University author celebration. 

 

The New Quarterly is a Canadian literary journal that has showcased national writers and writing for thirty-five years. Each issue focuses on bringing readers work by emerging and established writers through short fiction, poetry and creative non-fiction stories that explore both the craft and the writing life. The magazine first debuted in 1981, through the support of Newfoundland writer Harold Horwood (the then writer in residence at the University of Waterloo); financial help from pioneering journalist Edna Staebler; and Farley Mowat, one of Canada’s most widely read authors. TNQ offices are located at St. Jerome’s University, which allows for greater faculty involvement - Dr. Tristanne Connolly, Chair, Department of English, is a poetry editor for the publication - and access to student interns.  

 “We are over-the-top thrilled with two gold medals and two honourable mentions,” says TNQ editor Pamela Mulloy.

 

Poetry gold was won by Selina Boan for “(Good) ‘Girls Don’t Hitchhike’” / “Half/Brother” / “Meet Cree: A Practical Guide to the Cree Language.” Boan was a finalist in last year’s CBC Poetry Prize and is working on a collection of poems exploring her Cree and European heritage. Fiction gold was won by Richard Kelly Kemick for “The Unitarian Church’s Annual Young Writers’ Short Story Competition.”  TNQ also had two honourable mentions: Sharon Bala for “Miloslav” (Fiction), and Liz Windhorst Harmer for “My Flannery” (Essay).

 

“St. Jerome’s has a long and successful relationship with The New Quarterly,” stated Kline, “and these National Magazine awards confirm what we know: TNQ is a national treasure because it provides a well-recognized forum for so many creative and talented Canadian writers.”

Image source: National Magazine Foundation; quote courtesy of TNQ - Alister Thomas

© 2018 St. Jerome's University 

  • White Facebook Icon
  • White Instagram Icon
  • White Twitter Icon
  • email

290 Westmount Road, North | Waterloo, ON  N2L 3G3 | sjucomms@sju.ca | Tel: 519-884-8111 | www.sju.ca

St. Jerome's University Logo in white

We acknowledge that St. Jerome's University and the University of Waterloo are located on the traditional territory of the Neutral, Anishnawbe, and Haudenosaunee people.